Digger Wasp Hostage

Sand digger wasp with caterpillar

The sand digger wasp (Ammophila sabulosa) paralyses its prey

We encountered another variety of sand digger wasp on the heath recently – this time Ammophila sabulosa, which uses caterpillars to feed its larvae.

Sand digger wasp with caterpillar prey

Sand digger wasps’ prey may be 10 times heavier than the wasp itself

Similarly to the spider-hunting wasp (Anoplius viaticus) it paralyses its victim with venom from its sting and buries it in a nest burrow. The caterpillar remains paralysed until the wasp larvae hatch out and eat it alive!

Sand digger wasp excavating nest burrow

Female sand digger wasps excavate a short burrow in sand

The entire nest cycle from site location, through excavation and provisioning, to finally sealing the burrow, takes 8-10 hours to complete.

Many wasps have ingenious parasitic strategies, as these earlier blog posts illustrate:

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Springwatched

Spider hunting wasp with spider

Spider hunting wasp with paralysed arachnid prey

The team at BBC’s ‘Springwatch Unsprung’ programme used a sequence of my photos to illustrate the intriguing behaviour of the spider-hunting wasp, Anoplius viaticus.

This solitary wasp targets spiders, which it paralyses with venom and then hauls back to its subterranean nest burrow. Once wrestled inside the female wasp will lay its eggs on the spider’s body for its larvae to eat when they hatch.

Bug expert Nick Baker explained that this species stores its prey before excavating the burrow and so the unattended spider often becomes the victim of a tug-of-war between Anoplius viaticus and other opportunistic wasps and ants.

BBC Springwatch studio broadcast

Chris, Nick, Michaela, Martin and the Springwatch gang

Natural history superstar Mr. Chris Packham then related the curious fact that one of his first ever TV assignments was to film this invertebrate behaviour on nearby Studland Beach – this being made all the more awkward because it’s also frequented by enthusiastic naturists! Happily this particular site was a safe distance to the north on the peninsula. 🙂

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Hen Harrier Fox Ambush

We’re lucky to have at least two male hen harriers overwintering on the shores of Poole Harbour this year. They’re visually quite distinct from the female hen harrier and other local raptors like the buzzard and marsh harrier. From a distance they might be mistaken for a gull as they patrol above the reed beds.

On this particular afternoon I’d been sat in a freezing hide at Middlebere overlooking a channel off the harbour with several other people. The male hen harrier passed the hide on 2 occasions as it hunted, and we were well pleased.

As the light began to fade and the temperature dropped so my companions began to leave. As dusk approached it was just me and my camera when this fella chose to alight on the neighbouring fenceline:

Hen harrier

I couldn’t quite believe my luck. It was clearly aware of my presence but seemed entirely unbothered. The bird continued to survey the reeds from its vantage point for some minutes. I hurriedly assembled my tripod and mounted the camera to switch to video mode. At which point this happened:

The harrier clearly spotted something edible in the reeds and swooped in to grab it. Either it missed, or the prey got away at the first attempt, but the harrier did not give up and flapped around after it in the reeds.

Seeing this grounded raptor the local fox recognised a golden opportunity and rushed in while its back was turned. Foxy must have come within a couple of feet of success. In the slow motion sequence you can see the harrier attempt to lift off, with the prey in its grasp, but gets snagged on the reeds with almost fatal delay. What appears to be a small mammal, probably a vole, then falls from its clutches as it finally gets airborne.

The slightly dejected, but still rather smug looking fox, then sauntered off right past the hide:

Fox

Wily fox walks away