Oak Galls: Wasp vs. Plant

Oak trees are home to more than 30 species of gall wasp. The larval stage of these insects induce the plant to produce abnormal growths, known as galls, which enclose and protect them as they develop.

Oak gall wasp larva IV

Galls come in a variety of fantastical shapes, each unique to particular species.

Oak marble gall

Marble galls

Hard woody spherical galls up to 25mm in diameter on the oak stems. Initially green but later become brown.

Created by: Andricus kollari

Oak apple gall

Oak Apple Gall II

These galls have a spongy texture and are brownish white, tinged with pink.

Created by: Biorhiza pallida

Common spangle gall

Common Spangle Galls II

Yellowish gingery brown disc-shaped galls on the underside of oak leaves in late summer and early autumn.

Created by: Neuroterus quercusbaccarum

Silk button spangle gall

Silk Button Surfeit

Golden brown discs with a depressed centre on the underside of oak leaves in late summer through to early autumn.

Created by: Neuroterus numismalis

Knopper gall

Knopper gall

The acorn becomes a ridged woody structure. The gall is initially yellowish green and sticky but later greyish brown.

Created by: Andricus quercuscalicis

Cherry gall

Oak Cherry Galls

Yellowish green or red spherical galls up to 20mm in diameter on the underside of oak leaves in late summer and autumn.

Created by: Cynips quercusfolii

It gets complicated…

Oak gall wasps have complex life cycles, with alternating generations that are either sexual with males and females, or asexual with females only.

The two generations of wasp often produce different types of gall on different parts of the tree, and in some species the two generations alternate between native and non-native species of oak.

Oak Gall Wasps VI

There are also wasps which specialise in injecting their eggs into oak galls. Their larvae then eat the resident eggs or larvae before they emerge.

Chalcid Wasp

The example above shows a type of Chalcid wasp investigating a fresh oak marble gall.

Find out more

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s